About

Given that her hometown of Bruning, Nebraska, USA has a population of less than 300 people, it’s no wonder that Jennifer Lentfer found her calling in accompanying small, local organizations to be strong forces for social change. She has worked with 300+ grassroots organizations in the Global South over the past decade.

In 2010, she created the blog how-matters.org to help place community-driven initiatives at the forefront of international aid, philanthropy, and social enterprise. In 2012 she was named as one of Foreign Policy Magazine’s “100 women to follow on Twitter” at @intldogooder. She has also served with various international organizations in Zimbabwe, Malawi, Namibia, and the U.S., where she has focused on organizational development and learning.

Now as the Director of Communications at IDEX – International Development Exchange, Jennifer is constantly looking for ways to portray the realities of people’s lives, their struggles, their strengths–as well as outsiders’ roles and mistakes–in an impatient, “silver bullet solutions” world. Last year with her students at Georgetown University, she published “The Development Element: Guidelines for the future of communicating about the end of global poverty” and is currently co-editing a book on the growing community of small grantmakers that find and fund effective grassroots leaders around the world.

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To learn more about her professional profile, see http://www.linkedin.com/in/jenniferlentfer

“We appear to have forgotten what is needed to succeed with the people.” ~Njabulo S. Ndebele

“The best political, social, and spiritual work we can do is to withdraw the projection of our shadow onto others.” ~Carl Jung

Why the succulent icon? Vastly diverse species of succulent plants grow and thrive in some of the harshest and most beautiful places around the world. They are resilient, self-reliant, and adaptive to changing environmental conditions. Simply put, they are survivors.

Disclaimer: The opinions expressed here are mine and mine alone. Content contained herein is not intended to reflect the work of any of my past, present, or future employers.

 

16 Comments

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  4. Dear Jennifer. I read all your about us and i can see the expression of a harmful experience in international development. I am very glad to read these words from a foreign actor that highlights major (and unrecognized) problems surrounding international aid in Africa. I am running a local NGO in Benin (western africa) http://aced-benin.org and i always experience such realities.
    thanks

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