Posts Tagged ‘community ownership’

July 18th, 2016 - 3:00 pm § in Uncategorized

“…and this is what we are already doing about it”

"You’ll see that we have few resources but, what we do have, we use as best as we can." Sharing a booklet produced by Cassa Banana Community Health Committee in Zimbabwe. [...]

July 14th, 2016 - 10:00 am § in Guest Bloggers

Are NGOs missing the impact forest?

Impact truth lies in messy micro-nuances that determine whether target populations "vote" for interventions with their feet or wallets, argues guest blogger Michael Buckler of VillageX.[...]

April 18th, 2016 - 1:31 pm § in Good Practice, Reflection & Rumination

A new kind of donor: 4 things they do differently

Donors stuck in the old ways of moving money around don’t offer useful capital to new and innovative organizations that don’t fit the mold. Here’s four things a new kind of aid donor does better.[...]

September 26th, 2015 - 12:02 pm § in Good Practice, Reflection & Rumination

Hot money or cold money?

"The problem with all these outsiders is that you come in with your money and you don't warm it up." [...]

May 21st, 2014 - 3:00 pm § in Good Practice, Guest Bloggers

Knowing when (and why) to stop and listen

“The presenting problem and the real (or underlying) problem are different.” Joe Shaffner on Peter Block’s book, "Flawless Consulting: A Guide to Getting Your Expertise Used."[...]

March 3rd, 2014 - 10:17 am § in Guest Bloggers

Exploring the tension between theory and practice in community development

Guest blogger Koissaba B.R. Ole writes that while researchers grapple with theories and frameworks to explain the causes of communities' challenges, development practitioners are right at the midst of them.[...]

June 18th, 2013 - 8:26 am § in Good Practice

Spotting community ownership: A reminder

The processes of decision-making within local relationships and power dynamics are often the make-or-break factor in development projects. Are the people served invested in the outcomes of your program(s)? And most importantly, how can you know?[...]